The First City in America to Criminalize Marijuana Passes Resolution Criticizing Drug War


Click here for the full article at AlterNet.com:

“The El Paso city council has gone on record as condemning current US drug policies and demanding a shift to a smarter, more humane approach to drug sales and use.

February 17, 2010 |  A year ago, dismayed at the violence rocking its sister city of Ciudad Juárez just across the Rio Grande River, the city council in the remote Texas border city of El Paso unanimously passed a resolution calling for serious consideration of ending drug prohibition, only to see it vetoed by Mayor John Cook. Then, after heavy-handed warnings from US Rep. Silvestre Reyes (D-TX) and the city’s delegation in the state legislature that such a resolution could threaten the city’s funding, the city council backed down, failing to override Cook’s veto.

With those votes and the controversy surrounding them, El Paso was thrust into — and helped ignite — a national debate on the country’s drug policies. This week, the El Paso city council returned to the issue when, led by Councilmembers Beto O’Rourke and Steve Ortega, it considered a resolution calling for a “comprehensive examination of our country’s failed War on Drugs,” and advocating for “the repeal of ineffective marijuana laws” and their replacement with taxed, regulated, and controlled marijuana production, sales, and consumption for adults.

The resolution also called for an immediate meeting between Mexican President Felipe Calderon and US President Obama to address prohibition-related violence in Mexico, rejected the “militaristic” approach of Plan Merida, the three-year, $1.4 billion anti-drug assistance scheme for Mexico and Central America, called for that aid to be tied to strict human rights reporting requirements, and called for any additional aid to Mexico to be aimed at improving the country’s “social, educational, and economic development.”

“It’s up to us to act and make some tough decisions and do some uncomfortable things,” said O’Rourke, as he urged his colleagues to support the resolution.

“The fuel to the fire in Juárez is the profits of a black market,” said Councilwoman Susie Byrd, explaining why she supported the marijuana regulation language.

But not all the council members were in accord. “We didn’t talk about demand reduction. We didn’t talk about prevention, and we didn’t talk about treatment,” said Councilman Carl Robinson, explaining his vote against the resolution…”

Click here for the full article at AlterNet.com.

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